Categorized | NEWS

Cub, Oppidan break ground on grocery store, apartment complex

Posted on 27 March 2018 by calvin

The grocery store will be on the first floor of a five-story building that also includes 3,000 square feet of small-shop retail, 148 market-rate apartments, and a large public plaza. The grocery store is expected to open in the spring of 2019, and residents will begin moving into the apartments in the summer of 2019. (Graphic courtesy of Cub)

By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN
A Cub store at 46th and Hiawatha, featuring a new urban design, will be the first to anchor a residential complex being developed by Excelsior-based Oppidan Investment Company.

At 46,000-square-feet, the store will be about half the size of a typical Cub store. The existing Cub store on Lake St. that has recently been remodeled will remain.
“We’re going to build a pretty incredible store,” said Cub Foods President of Operations Chad Ferguson during a groundbreaking ceremony on Thur., Mar. 15. “This will be truly unique.”

He pointed out that in addition to stocking groceries for meals made from scratch, the new store will offer inspirational items that require some food prep, as well as full meals that are ready to go.

Photo right: “We’re going to build a pretty incredible store,” said Cub Foods President of Operations Chad Ferguson during a groundbreaking ceremony on Mar. 15. “This will be truly unique.” In addition to a large deli area with Quick and Easy® and made-to-order meals, the new urban store will feature a theater-feel popcorn shop, a farmer’s market layout in the produce section, enhanced floral gift space, and a pharmacy. Delivery services for the neighborhood and apartment complex will be available. Visitors will also be able to enjoy a spacious outdoor seating area, complete with bicycle parking, as well as a walk-up window serving coffees, ice creams, and signature cookie sandwiches year-round from the Refresh! juice bar. (Photo by Tesha M. Christensen)

The design of the store features multiple entrances, lots of natural light, and an expansive indoor café-style space that welcomes guests to take a break or plug-in for work.

“We’re evolving our look and feel while showcasing new shopping innovations for a better experience for our customers. We feel this new format Cub is a perfect fit for this neighborhood,” said Anne Dament, Executive Vice President of Retail, Marketing, and Private Brands at SuperValu.

Fostering community
One of Cub’s four pillars is Cub in the community, pointed out Ferguson, and this new store will foster a community atmosphere in ways other Cub stores don’t because of its location within a transit-orientated, mixed-use development near a Blue Line station.

The grocery store will be on the first floor of a five-story building that also includes 3,000 square feet of small-shop retail, 148 market-rate apartments, and a large public plaza. The site was formerly home to the Creative KidStuff corporate office building that was recently demolished.

“We’re very excited to see the culmination of over a year of planning and development,” said Drew Johnson, Vice President of Oppidan Investment Company. “Cub has done a great job responding to and incorporating stakeholder feedback into their store design. The finished project will be a tremendous asset to the neighborhood.”

Photo left: “We’re very excited to see the culmination of over a year of planning and development,” said Drew Johnson, Vice President of Oppidan Investment Company. “Cub has done a great job responding to and incorporating stakeholder feedback into their store design. The finished project will be a tremendous asset to the neighborhood.” (Photo by Tesha M. Christensen)

“You couldn’t pick a better location,” said Andrew Johnson, Minneapolis Ward 12 Council Member. “It’s across the street from the busiest park in the state, on LRT and BRT lines with several prominent bike paths nearby, and a short walk to Minnehaha Creek and the Mississippi River.”

The development serves as the pilot phase of the two-mile “Min Hi Line,” a multi-modal pedestrian path and linear park that will eventually provide connectivity from Minnehaha Park all the way to the Midtown Greenway. This pilot project will be constructed on a section of former railroad right-of-way now owned by the city of Minneapolis.

“It’s an idea whose time has finally come with the Oppidan development because they choose to orientate their development to the line,” remarked Min-Hi Line co-founder Cora Peterson, who grew up in East Nokomis.

Photo right: The development serves as the pilot phase of the two-mile “Min Hi Line,“ a multi-modal pedestrian path and linear park that will eventually provide connectivity from Minnehaha Park all the way to the Midtown Greenway. “It’s an idea whose time has finally come with the Oppidan development because they choose to orientate their development to the line,” remarked Min Hi Line co-founder Cora Peterson, who grew up in East Nokomis. (Photo by Tesha M. Christensen)

The line will help green the urban landscape and provide social connectedness, Peterson pointed out. “The development of the Min-Hi Line is the next step to ensure that Minneapolis and the Twin Cities continue to lead in quality of life nationally,” she said.

Innovative features
This new, urban design comes as the Stillwater-based Cub celebrates its 50th anniversary. Cub was established in 1968 as one of the nation’s first discount grocery stores. The organization was purchased in 1980 by SuperValu® and operates 80 grocery stores in Minnesota and Illinois. Nearly all of the large supermarket chains are testing smaller market stores in response to customers who may not want to walk through large stores anymore and are used to shopping online.

Ferguson credited the many Cub staff members who helped give life to the innovative features in this urban design.

In addition to a large deli area with Quick and Easy® and made-to-order meals, the new urban store will feature a theater-feel popcorn shop, a farmer’s market layout in the produce section, enhanced floral gift space, and a pharmacy. Delivery services for the neighborhood and apartment complex will be available.

Visitors will also be able to enjoy a spacious outdoor seating area, complete with bicycle parking, as well as a walk-up window serving coffees, ice creams, and signature cookie sandwiches year-round from the Refresh! juice bar.

“There will be so many cool touches that will make this not only a place to pick up groceries, but a place to gather—and create a social experience which I know is important to the area,” said Ferguson.

Development fulfills local vision from 2002
In the 1960s, a six-lane freeway was planned for Hiawatha Ave., but the neighbors said, “No,” recalled Hennepin County District 4 Commissioner Peter McLaughlin, who lives a few blocks away from the Oppidan development. Through the transformative power of the neighbor’s vision, the area is home to Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), light rail (LRT), small businesses, apartments, and more.

In 2002, the county invested a small amount to fashion a plan for the area at 46th and Hiawatha, based on neighborhood input, pointed out McLaughlin. This plan provided the framework for Oppidan’s vision for high-density use at the site.

“This area of Minneapolis has experienced exciting growth with higher-density residential projects, due in part to its proximity to downtown, MSP Airport, the Blue Line light rail, bike trails and Minnehaha Regional Park,” said Oppidan Vice President of Development Drew Johnson. “However, the neighborhood does not have a full-serve grocery store to complement this residential growth. When this project opens, over 10,000 people will be within a 10-minute walk of this store.”

The grocery store is expected to open in the spring of 2019, and residents will begin moving into the apartments in the summer of 2019. The project’s general contractor is Anderson Companies, and the architect is Pope.

A-Tree Services

Habitat for Humanity

Chanhassen Camp Opportunities

St. Paul College

Nilles-Filler-Combo-Online-ad-10292015